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Construction Site Injuries Archives

Encouraging worker safety on construction sites

Construction sites are dotted with all kinds of risks and dangers. Heavy equipment and machinery, precarious circumstances and constant noise can contribute to an environment that must be carefully navigated to avoid unnecessary and serious accidents. Fortunately, there are many preventative steps that proactive Minnesota construction companies can take in encouraging their workers to be safe and follow the rules. 

Repetitive stress injuries on construction sites

Workers on construction sites in Minnesota face many possible injuries. While some are quite obvious, such as falls or electrocution risks, others may not be so clear, yet these injuries can be just as serious. Repetitive stress injuries, according to the National Safety Council, are injuries caused by doing a motion over and over. These injuries are often associated with office workers or even athletes, but construction workers are at just as much risk when they are performing the same tasks for long periods of time over many days.

How do crush injuries happen?

If you work in the construction industry in St. Paul, your working conditions as well as the tools of your trade serve as constant reminders that yours is one of the most dangerous occupations in America. There are many different scenarios that you may encounter on the job site that could put you and others in jeopardy. Crush injuries rank among those whose dangerous potential is likely the least appreciated. Despite being listed among the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's "Fatal Four," crush accidents and their causes are still largely under-researched and unanticpated by employers.

A closer look at common construction site accidents

Construction workers face unique risks in an industry that requires heavy machinery and powerful tools along with exposure to heights and other dangers, to get a job done. While many Minnesota construction companies do their best to adhere to designated safety protocols and procedures, the chance of an on-site accident is always present.

Electrocution dangers at construction sites

For many construction workers in Minnesota and other states across the country, one of the biggest risks faced every day is electrocution. The reasons for this danger are varied and can affect workers in almost any part of the industry. We at Fellman Law Office can not only help if you or a loved one have been injured by electrocution, we have also provided information on the top causes of this danger so you can be better protected.

Injuries commonly suffered by construction workers

As a Minnesota construction worker, you face a unique set of hazards that place you at considerable risk of suffering a work-related injury. At the Fellman Law Office, we assist many clients who suffer injuries while performing jobs like yours, and we have a solid understanding of the physical and financial hardships that can develop because of your chosen career.

Understand construction workplace hazards and protect yourself

Workplace injuries in the construction industry are commonplace, and the best way to avoid them is to know where hazards occur and to have a plan to protect every worker on every team at the job site. That means making sure everyone understands the most prevalent types of construction injuries and the best measures to take to protect themselves and the rest of their teams. When everyone is participating to make sure the work site is safe, it is easier to avoid being caught by these common injury hazards.

Construction employees' rights under OSHA

If you work in the construction industry, you’re likely familiar with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The program is part of the Department of Labor and sets safety standards that apply to construction and other industries.

Fellman Law Office
400 Robert Street North Suite 1740
Saint Paul, MN 55101

Toll Free: 866-532-5051
Phone: 651-222-9515
Fax: 651-225-5656
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